6 Tips for Dating in Recovery

Why are relationships so challenging for recovering addicts? The main reason is that an intimate relationship has the potential to be all-consuming. This can be particularly dangerous for someone who is in an extremely vulnerable state after making such an intensive life change as choosing sobriety. The possibility of replacing a substance addiction with another type of addiction is extremely high. Experts say love in recovery can lead to unhealthy, co-dependent relationships, which can all too often lead to a relapse. Addicts have learned to cling to the substances and habits that they relied on during their struggles, before they embarked on the journey of recovery. During this time, they developed many unhealthy coping mechanisms, which can include becoming extremely dependent on those who enabled and supported them throughout this behaviour. Starting a new relationship while in this state of mind rarely ends well. The lives of addicts are very different from those of sober people.

A Guide to Romantic Relationships in Recovery

We’re Here to Help As an essential healthcare provider, We are open and supporting those in need of addiction treatment at all locations. Learn More. From creating attractive online dating profiles to attempting to decipher all the different signals someone is sending your way, dating is a dizzying experience. But then, you meet someone you connect with almost instantly.

And if you’re a recovering addict yourself, don’t despair. By following the right precautions, you can successfully navigate the world of dating and.

Before you start thinking about the other person in your relationship, spend some time looking at yourself and your motivation for choosing to date someone in recovery. They need to be responsible for taking appropriate actions on a daily basis to preserve their recovery. If you have just met someone you are interested in, you are going to be listening carefully to everything they share about themselves.

Recovery is an ongoing process, and someone who is being honest will tell you that up front. A good sign is someone who is actively participating in a recovery plan and taking steps to look after their health by staying active, eating well and getting enough rest. Visit your local library or look for online resources to learn about this subject. You can also check out government and educational websites for information.

The first year or two of getting sober is challenging for most people. Adding the good stress of a new relationship is not recommended. If you meet someone interesting during the early stages of recovery, exchange emails anyway. Ask the person to get in touch in three or six months if they would like to follow up.

5 Questions to Ask Before You Start Dating a Recovering Addict

First dates are awkward at best and downright disasters at worst. Perhaps the difficulty of dating is why there are currently more single people than ever before. However, sometimes the difficulties of dating can be a good thing.

Dating and alcohol go hand-in-hand for many people who are on the lookout for a partner. But what is dating like for singles in who are in recovery for alcohol.

Call Now Relationships can be part of healing, but finding healthy partners who support your recovery is a challenge. Dating carries obvious risks. Tatkin has seen many online dating success stories. Ask yourself: Would you feel confident introducing this person to your friends or family? Does the person show signs of addictive thinking or behavior? Tatkin warns. It takes approximately a year to know another person as separate from our fantasies about them and us.

So the proper etiquette is to be a stranger, which is what you are. Compounding the fact that we know very little about a date, our brains release a powerful cocktail of arousing chemicals, compromising our judgment and making us more vulnerable to danger. Tatkin describes it, at the mercy of chemicals that drive us to procreate. Standard advice is to hold off on dating for the first year in recovery, largely because relationships take your focus off of your own healing and, with their emotional highs and lows, are a leading cause of relapse.

For some, relationships and sex emerge as an addictive behavior. Some may find themselves attracted to someone who is also struggling with addiction, emotionally unavailable or abusive.

Is Dating During Recovery a Good Idea?

Relationships can be stressful in any circumstance. It is not easy to find someone who shares your values, will be supportive of you and your life goals, and is pursuing the goals you support. Even when everything is sparkly and new in the beginning, there are always a few red flags that pop up that indicate some work will be required in the future.

The good news is that everyone is different. Not everyone is in the same place in their relationship with drugs and alcohol or their ability to handle a serious relationship.

Many sex and love addicts rush through—or skip over—two important aspects of dating, which undermine the potential for a healthy romantic relationship. These.

For many, this means dating. But is looking for a new relationship, or just playing the field, in early recovery a wise thing to do? As with any other aspect of addiction and recovery, everyone is different. That means you may not be in the best place to judge who would be a suitable partner. A break-up can trigger anger or depression, which can prompt you to want desperately to self-medicate. Remember that your number-one priority is getting well and you need to focus on yourself for this period.

Do you trust yourself again? Are you able to experience triggers without relapsing? Are you using healthy coping mechanisms for dealing with daily stress and turbulent emotions? Perhaps the most important question to ask yourself is, Have you developed a dating plan with your counselor, sponsor or therapist? This is especially crucial for recovering love or sex addicts, who tend to have a long history of unhealthy relationships but it can benefit any type of addict.

This plan will include a list of healthy dating goals and can include things like:. Here are a few more reasons why waiting to date is best: Dating can be an unhealthy coping mechanism.

Dating a Recovering Addict

Dating relationships and finding the one is not an easy feat. It can be a long journey full of uncertainties. Everyone experiences these feelings but for individuals who are recovering from addiction , these emotions may be a lot more intense.

(This, of course, is particularly dangerous for those who are in recovery from love/​relationship, sex and/or porn addictions.) Limerence, which is the rush you get.

Dating in general is tough and time consuming. From the butterflies to the impromptu date nights to the first real fight, dating can be quite the distraction from your everyday responsibilities and ultimately from your recovery. Getting back on the dating train too soon can be bad for business in early recovery. The feel-good hormones that are synonymous with those lovely first few months of hanging out with someone special are awesome — but can replace your drug of choice to become your new fix.

Which is toxic for you and your new potential love. This may sound harsh but, think about your addiction as a disease or sickness — which is exactly what it is. You want to get better. Because being sick sucks. You want to sit around your apartment, drink tea, eat soup, and Netflix your favorite movies. When you are in residential drug rehab, you are on a path of self discovery, which sounds way more fun that it often is.

Stuff comes up from your past and you learn things about yourself that help you to figure out how you came to start using in the first place. So, starting something up with someone new when you are in this in-between stage with yourself can really only lead to disaster. We can provide information about the treatment programs at our intensive outpatient addiction treatment center and answer any questions you might have about your addiction and recovery.

Dating a Past Drug Addict or Alcoholic

This service provides referrals to local treatment facilities, support groups, and community-based organizations. Callers can also order free publications and other information. English and Spanish are available if you select the option to speak with a national representative. In the first quarter of , the Helpline received an average of 68, calls per month. This is an increase from , with an average monthly call volume of 67, or , total calls for the year.

The referral service is free of charge.

Dating and relating can be challenging, to say the least. When you add the fact that the person you are seeing is a recovering addict, it adds a.

The editorial staff of Rehabs. Our editors and medical reviewers have over a decade of cumulative experience in medical content editing and have reviewed thousands of pages for accuracy and relevance. Recovery is a time for self-care and reflection, establishing structure and controlling urges. Most weeks, Saturday nights are spent at 12 step meetings. To be clear, no professional would ever recommend dating in early recovery. But, we have to be realistic and look at cases individually. Whether you are single and getting sober, or recovery is a part of your relationship, here are some tips to help you date smarter and safer.

Recovery is an ongoing process of self-discovery. A therapeutic environment is a necessity for learning more functional patterns of behavior and gaining insight into the origins of your disease. In therapy, you will work on assessing readiness, especially for the dating game. Facing uncharted dating territory without your usual liquid courage can increase your risk for relapse.

Handling Love and Dating in Recovery

When they finally manage to get past all of the chemical baggage that they had been carrying with them for so long, what you will find in most instances is that former addicts have just as many outstanding qualities as anyone else, and this can make them a joy to be around for family and friends alike. But what about romance, dating, and even marriage?

Is it wise to form a more intimate connection with an ex-addict or alcoholic, no matter how dramatically they appear to have turned their lives around? In looking at the experiences of others, what we can say is that many who have formed romantic partnerships with former substance abusers have come to regret that decision immensely, while others have been able to establish satisfying permanent relationships with those who have successfully put their past addictions behind them.

So there really is no hard and fast rule here — but there are some things you should think about before getting more deeply involved with someone in recovery.

A breakup can be even harder when you’re leaving a relationship because your partner can’t shake off the long shadow cast by past addiction. If.

At first glance, the person across the table looks amazing, has a great personality, and offers several qualities that you find attractive in a partner. But then, a discussion of addiction comes up, and from there, a little bit of anxiety may set in. Dating a recovering addict isn’t out of the question, but it helps to go into the situation well aware of the special circumstances that are going to surround the relationship.

A recovering addict tends to avoid certain things. For instance, a person attempting to get sober is probably not going to be around alcohol for an extended amount of time. The temptation may be too much to handle, and it isn’t worth the risk. Make sure that you are understanding of these situations and concede to the boundaries that are set out. Making your partner feel safe and comfortable with you is a big step.

Most of the time, dating an addict means making time for support groups, meetings, or even addiction counseling. It can be frustrating and inconvenient for your date to have commitments at certain times of the week. In some cases, these meetings are a necessity as they get help in a crisis. Remember that all of these things are an important part of maintaining a life away from substance abuse.

Dating Someone in Addiction Recovery

People fall under addictions for a myriad of reasons: the loss of a loved one, financial struggles, or general unhappiness. Drug abuse such as drinking alcohol or smoking cigarettes have proven to be common coping mechanisms , albeit unhealthy ones. Among the most common reasons people abuse drugs are their struggles or failures in their love life. Whether it a divorce of a previous relationship or the struggle to maintain one, these problems often cause great grief.

For some people, failure in love can dictate their self-worth and be a central part of life.

When you are in addiction recovery and begin to date someone it is important to share your addiction history at some point but when?

Depending on your background and how much you understand about the disease of addiction, reactions will vary. How can the person you know now be the same person who abused drugs or alcohol? For others, it may be a little easier to accept, especially in cases where one has dealt either first or second hand with a substance use disorder.

Recovery is a long process. While everyone has their own unique timeline, it is most risky to get involved with a person in their first year of recovery. The first year should be dedicated to a lot of self-work and self-care, as well as learning how to create healthy routines. The more you are able to understand their addiction and triggers, the more you will be able to understand their emotional undercurrent.

Rather, you should ask questions that show you want to gain a deeper understanding of them.

Dating an Addict Here Are the Five Things You Should Know


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