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Indian Matchmaking is a Indian documentary television series produced by Smriti Mundhra. Indian Matchmaking was released on July 16, , on Netflix. Mundhra named the casting the biggest hurdle of the show, going through a client list of families and calling to see if they were willing to be on camera. Mundhra also noted that the series initially started with about a dozen singles but with some that “fell off” during production. The show received mixed reviews between critics and social media users. In addition to showing ” classist ” and ” casteist ” stereotypes, the show was criticized for whitewashing the idea of arranged marriages. The Los Angeles Times followed up with the couples appearing on the show and reported that they are not together anymore. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Entertainment Weekly.

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You want to share your life with someone special. I had lived my life up until that point thinking that finding a life partner is something that would not take any effort — that it is something that would just happen. After hearing that, I contacted Jasbina myself. I thought she would tell me to be someone I am not. Instead she embraced who I truly am — and helped me show that side to others. There was a woman I wanted to meet, who I thought was out of my reach i.

Indian Matchmaking Exposes the Easy Acceptance of Caste includes, but is hardly limited to, workplace discrimination in the United States.

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Mixing documentary modes with dating show ridicule, it maintains and masks the most insidious injury arranged by marriage: caste.

People who are offended by ‘Indian Matchmaking’ prove its point

Analysis by S. Mitra Kalita , CNN. Chat with us in Facebook Messenger.

Netflix show that follows couples in a quest for marriage in India and the US has sparked fierce debate.

The “Snyder Cut” is here! The director unveiled the first trailer for the long-awaited Zack Snyder’s Justice League. Watch the trailer. Title: Indian Matchmaking —. A four-part documentary series following young adults on the autism spectrum as they explore the unpredictable world of love, dating and relationships. A Suitable Girl follows three young women in India struggling to maintain their identities and follow their dreams amid intense pressure to get married.

The film examines the women’s complex relationship with marriage, family, and society. The film follows a small town cop who is summoned to investigate the death of a politician which gets complicated by the victim’s secretive family and his own conflicted heart. In this reality show, couples overcome obstacles to celebrate their love in surprise dream weddings designed by three experts in less than a week. In a series of flirtations and fails, six real-life singles navigate five blind dates.

Their mission: Find one perfect match worthy of a second date. The drama ramps up when a new agent joins the team.

Why Does “Indian Matchmaking” Make My Culture Seem So Burdensome?

The Mumbai-based matchmaker Sima Taparia delivers this meme-friendly one-liner in the seventh episode of the hit Netflix series Indian Matchmaking. But she departs from this well-worn model in her attention to one extra characteristic: caste. This silent shadow hangs over every luxurious living room she leads viewers into. She lumps an entire social system, which assigns people to a fixed place in a hierarchy from birth, together with anodyne physical preferences.

This prejudiced treatment includes, but is hardly limited to, workplace discrimination in the United States.

In the new Netflix docuseries, “Indian Matchmaking,” affluent Indian than Indians living in the U.S. And Indians who have emigrated to the.

And of course I have. I really cannot stress this enough: Agrabah is not a real place! The genre, after all, encapsulates so much of the human condition, from its elegant docuseries to the shows where women throw wine at each other while their husbands mutter anti-gay slurs in the background. High art! A well-lit, well-produced, empathetic docuseries, it follows matchmaker Sima Taparia as she tries to set up Indians both in India and the US for arranged marriages. But both series have felt unsatisfying to me.

Mindy Kaling comes out with something new every few years, which many Indian Americans find exciting, and the work of brown women is sorely needed in a white media landscape. Some Indian people like myself benefit from being Brahmin Hindus with fair skin and straight hair and last names that tell you exactly what caste we were born into.

We become a wedge minority. Even though nothing is really for us, we get some of it anyway. Our proximity to whiteness, especially in contrast to Black and darker-skinned brown people, means that television shows made for and by white people can sometimes inadvertently speak to us. I suppose I should be grateful? So what would an audience — namely a predominantly white audience — take away from shows like Family Karma and, more urgently, Indian Matchmaking?

That being Indian is a nuisance?

Indian Matchmaking is a canny indictment of a fraying institution

No one in my immediate family has had an arranged marriage, but I have many relatives who have. But I also know they rarely favor brides-to-be, expecting them to meet caste, color and body requirements as well as stereotypical gender roles. The show bills itself as exploring traditional Indian matchmaking practices in a modern world. Taparia characterizes her role as a matchmaker as a conduit for the divine.

Indian Matchmaking: Netflix’s ‘divisive’ dating show causes storm. Series following contestants hoping to be chosen for arranged marriage has.

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Inside Netflix’s eye-opening look at arranged marriage, your next reality TV obsession

Few people in the Capital can talk about matchmaking as insightfully as Poonam Sachdev. Their catchphrase Rishte Hi Rishte: Ek Baar Mil Toh Lein matches and more matches, meet us at least once used to be scrawled along railway tracks across north India in the s. Sachdev, 53, who has been in the business of matchmaking for 30 years, says Covid has made her job more complicated than ever before.

Suddenly, a lot of people seem to believe in a simple marriage. Her sentiments are shared by many other well-known matchmakers in Delhi, who before the pandemic had an estimated 3, matrimonial bureaus. While a large number of them have had to permanently shut shop in the past three months, as business has nosedived like never before, those that have survived say finding a perfect match has never been so tough.

and the United States who have historically been unlucky in love are matched in Netflix’s new series Indian Matchmaking. The show’s allure.

These men and women — or boys and girls, as they are referred to in Indian society, perhaps to reinforce their youth and innocence — of Indian origin are in their 20s and 30s, living in India and the US. Credit: Netflix. Indian Matchmaking just takes this concept further. Of course, each of these comes with their own good, bad and ugly. I think the entire experience felt like going on a journey with no idea as to what could turn up next.

There have always been matchmakers and, more recently, marriage agencies that connected families. And every Indian family has a Sima Mami who offers women unsolicited, and often blunt, advice to wear more make-up, or hit the gym to lose weight, if they ever hope to get married. Despite this sociocultural context, Indian Matchmaking has generated a lot of outrage, with critics and viewers alike accusing the show of playing up — or, at the very least, not critiquing — everything regressive in Indian society.

Words like hate-watch and cringe-fest have regularly featured on social media.

United States Matrimony

Based on criteria they provide, clients are matched with ostensibly compatible dates, but they soon find that the goal of marriage is more difficult to attain that they had hoped — even with a matchmaker who consults biological data profiles, astrologers and face readers. Listen Listening Does the addictively bingeable series provide an accurate look at the process of arranged marriage for Indians and Indian Americans in ?

Indians living in India approach marriage and dating differently than Indians living in the U. And Indians who have emigrated to the U.

Sima Taparia jets between Mumbai and the US to arrange marriages, perpetuating gender and caste stereotypes – which only make us mad.

Matchmaker Sima Taparia guides clients in the U. Sima meets three unlucky-in-love clients: a stubborn Houston lawyer, a picky Mumbai bachelor and a misunderstood Morris Plains, N. Friends and family get honest with Pradhyuman. Sima consults a face reader for clarity on her clients. A setback with Vinay temporarily discourages Nadia. Sima offers two more prospects to Aparna.

Why Wasn’t Netflix India Involved in ‘Indian Matchmaking’?

Five years ago, I met with a matchmaker. I went in scornful. Like many of my progressive South Asian peers, I denounced arranged marriage as offensive and regressive. But when the matchmaker recited her lengthy questionnaire, I grasped, if just for a beat, why people did things this way. Do you believe in a higher power? No idea.

Sima Taparia in a still from ‘Indian Matchmaking‘. Towards the end of Greta Gerwig’s Little Women, standing in the attic, stuttering with frustration.

Now available to stream, the series follows Mumbai-based matchmaker Sima Taparia as she painstakingly works with singles and their families in India and America to find desirable mates for marriage. One client, New Jersey-based event planner Nadia, wonders if her Indian-ness will come into question because of her Guyanese heritage. With the global reach of Netflix, Mundhra saw an opportunity to present a look at dating and relationships through the very specific lens of the South Asian experience that would reach a wide audience.

That we have all sorts of different backgrounds, different ideals and ideologies. I think you can sort of learn a lot just from the examples and the specific journey of the participants. Mundhra ultimately met her now-husband in graduate school. There was this refreshing honesty about her, and absolute passion for what she does.

Funniest Indian matrimonial videos ever


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